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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, not residential or commercial uses. this is really about a big chunk of the california economy that's pushing very hard for a certain result. >> and brown said, for a state as big as california with the economy like it, people need reliable water. and certainly, he has those interests in mind. he is selling this as a plan to preserve that water liability and fix the ecological problems. they are including thousands and thousands of habitat restoration which will help the fish. >> belva: in the past, it has been a big south/north debate. now this seems not to necessarily be that geographic. who are the sides here? >> it is an interesting breakdown. certainly the loudest opposition is coming from the delta. the farmers are extremely concerns of the construction and concerned about the water. the interesting split with the environmental groups. some are opposed to this as they were 30 years ago. others are waiting to see if the benefits will be greater than the harm for the species in trouble. >> there is a political split, too. our united states senators are on board with the plan, but the congressi
captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> the u.s. supreme court ruling on the afford able care act means california's reform on the way is on the right track. >> the era of late budgets is over and i believe that if we continue on this path, this era of unending deficits will be over. >> california has an on time budget, but it is not without some pain, including furloughs for thousands of state workers and the elimination of the healthy families program. education funding remains intact if the voters approve the governor's tax plan in november. state funding to keep all state parks open past the original july 1st deadline. the need for a long-term funding solution remains. coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm belva davis. welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me tonight on the panel are, paul rogers, san jose news environment writer, and josh richm richman. we start with a look at thursday's highly anticipated ruling by the u.s. supreme court upholding key provisions of the affordable care act. how does the decision impact california where reform is
approved for a new use to prevent hiv infection. some activists and researchers are calling this a milestone. that is the first time in more than 30 years of the epidemic that we have an actual drug that can prevent people from acquiring the virus. the concern is the handful of people who call this a catastrophe and worry people may abandon safer sex practices and put themselves at risk of acquiring the virus. truvada in men who have sex with men and engage in high-risk behavior, it is reducing the risk of the hiv virus by 42%. in heterosexual couples, one is hiv negative and one positive, it reduces by 75% as long as they use safer sex practices. >> belva: maybe the introduction of truvada was an introduction to the beginning of the end. >> so -- >> belva: in terms of finding a cure. >> it is certainly a new weapon in the arsenal of hiv which segues into the international aids conference that starts this weekend. that is where, as the whole, one of the themes of the conference is the beginning of the end. >> lisa, is this going to be widely available and affordable to peopl
. gerrymandering has gotten us to the point where californians are not ready for the pig. the senate is following the legislature has approved roughly $8 billion on the spending on the first leg of this. that would run roughly from fresno to bakersfield. as you know, the burning demand for high-speed demand from fresno to bakersfield. >> the high-speed train to nowhere? >> i'm being facetious. if you don't build a project that people don't, they won't come. people think of "field of dreams." that is not how high-speed rail works. japanese and french officials. they run the tgb in french. they say this can work, but your market is in san francisco and in l.a. people who want to go very quickly between those two hubs. the idea that -- >> i'm sorry. it is not going to be high-speed rail. it is a medium-speed rail. >> it's what is called a blended system right now. where you will get the high-speed rail in the central valley, although with spots in palmdale and fresno and gilroy and bakersfield. once you get into the urban areas on the peninsula and down here in southern california in l.a., you will
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)